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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> welcome to the program. tonight we begin with new orleans the city, and three people who recently moved back here because of their love of it. reflecting are james carville, mary matalin and julia reed. >> so what do you love about being here? >> let us count the ways. >> this is the way that i can explain new orleans. everybody else talks about a quality of life. you live in washington,-- the mondayments, the buildings, the kennedy center, the universities, the great medical centres, very highly rated quality of life. here no one ever speaks of the quality of life, it's a way of life. we have our music, our food, our social structure, our architecture, our body of literature. we even have our own funerals. so weeasure qlity of life by way of life, if our way of iv is intact and our culture is intact, then that's fine. and we don't really, in a big part of our way of life is to be comfortable with our otherness. we really don't aspire. we love to go to new york. we love to go to las vegas, and we love to go to washington, or anywhere. >> rose: even paris. >> paris who wou
in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i spoke to him on tuesday if he 90-- 29nd street y here in new york and here is part of that conversation. >> i should take note of the fact that this book is dedicated to his mother, pauline gore o ddt age 92 in 2004, his father died when he was 90. this is good genes, i'm telling you here. and in the dedication he said she gave me a future and a an abiding curiosity about what it holds and a sense of our commune human ablegation to help shape it. so this book is about the question of what are the drivers that are chan
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: michelle rhee is here. she is one of those widely known and perhaps most controversial figures in education. she served as chancellor of the d.c. public school system from 2007 to 2010. her sweeping reforms and hard-nosed style have changed the national debate ov school refo. sh has written a new book about her vision for american education. it's called "radical: fighting to put students first." i am pleased to have michelle rhee back at this table. welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: why did you call it "radical"? >> you know, when i started the job in d.c. i was -- i took over the lowest performing and dysfunctional school district in the entire nation. so i started making very rapid changes. i started closing down low-performing schools, removing ineffective educators, icut a central office beaucracy in half. to me those seemed like really obvious moves to make. >> rose: right. >> what was interesting, though, is people started saying "she's a lightning rod, she's radical, she's d
city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: madeleine albright is here. she was secretary of sta fro 1997 to001. her approach to american foreign policy was marked by a muscular commitment to the ideal of democracy. her story began in far away lands, she was born in czechoslovakia before the start of world war ii. she looks back at her childhood in her latest book called "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war." the paper back version is just out. i am pleased to have her on this program. welcome. >> wonderful to visit you. thank you. >> rose: you told me about this wonderful organization that you have started which is called -- which is all about the former foreign ministers around the world. >> it's sponsored by aspin, it's the aspin foreign ministers forum we its unofficial name is madeleine and her exes. >> rose: (laughs) >> and we meet a couple times a year talk and share a lot of experience. i have a business, i have a global consulting firm and i teach at georgetown and i'm chairman of the board of the national democratic institute which is something that was started i
continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: carmelo anthony is here. he is one of the best basketball players in the world. he is a six-time n.b.a. all-star and two-time olympic gold medal winner. this saturday his college jersey was retired in syracuse where he led his team to an n.c.a.a. championship in 2003. here's some footage from the ceremony. >> carmelo anthony not only won us a national championship, he helped us build our program to a completely other level by helping us build the carmelo anthony center. and this is from a guy who was here one year and he's brought so much to syracuse basketball beyondhe nation championship that he has really left a legacy for syracuse basketball. (cheers and applause) >> today a syracuse legend to have his jersey retired, please join us, carmelo anthony. (cheers and applause) >> rose: in 2003, carmelo was drafted by the denver nuggets in 2011 he was traded to the place where he was born, new york city. right now the new york nicks are in second place in the eastern conf
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: associate justice sonia tomayor is here. she made history in 2009 when she became the first hispanic and the third woman to sit on the supreme court. her story embodies the american dream. she grew up in a public housing project in the south bronx. at age seven she was diagnosed with type one diabetes. her father a factory worker died the following year. she and her younger brother were raised by a single mom who worked long hours just to make ends meet. but adversity did not stop her from ascending to the top of her profession. she went from high school valedictorian to princeton graduate to law review editor at yale. she served as a prosecutor and a corpate late gator before she was appointed as a district court judge. while still in her 30s. and then was appointed to the court of appeals. 11 years later she was sworn in as the nation's 111th justice. she tells her personal story in a new memoir. is it called "my beloved world." i am very pleased to have justice sonia sotomayor at this table for the first time. we
for the hour, next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the story of dk cheney is the story of power. he served two terms as vice president, president george w. bush from twub two 2008. he was also secretary of defense he was also chief of staff to president gerald ford. the "washington post" has called him the most influential and powerful man ever to hold the office. he was in washington an insider. his story is a story not only of power but because of what happened after 9/11 it's a story of power and values. we begin a conversation that took place in washington. mr. vice predent, thank you very mu for taking time to see us for this conversation. how's your health? >> much, much bet, thank you. i had lived with coronary artery disease since i was 37 years old 1978. had six heart attacks and nearly everything else that you could do yourself. i had an episode of ventricular fibrillation, my heart stopped. my life was saved by an implanted defibrillator. so i've been through a lot a as of last march i got a
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> mike more sits here, the chairman of sequoia capital it is one of silicon valley's most prominent venture capital firms ha made successful invesents in google, and linked in, among others he started his career as a journalist at "time" magazine. i'm pleased to have him here at the table for the first time. >> thank you. >> rose: it he is a pleasure to you have at the table. >> likewise. >> rose: i want to go back to europement tell me about your grandfather and your father and coming here. >> so my-- both my parents were born in nazi, germany. or they were born in ger nanny. like a lot of other jews obviously the future wasn't there for them. and their parents organized their depar ture in the mid 1930s to britain. my mother and father didn't know each other at that point. they met later in britain. and both my mother and my father were lucky enough to get scholarships to attend high shool in the case of my mothernd th high school and university in the case of my father. and my mother's parents escaped from germany r
by the following. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: john done a hoe is here. he became ceo of ebay in march of 2008 but he is not a founder of ceo like zucker man, page. he rose to the ranks before moving to ebay. under his leadership ebay has gone from strength to strength including a 75% rally in share price. the company started off as an on-line auction house but it became a giant of e commerce. 70% of itssales and also owns pay pal an on-line payment system. i am pleased to have him here at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. a pleasure to be here. >> charlie: my pleasure. so when you arrived at ebay and had the kinds of responsibilities you had before, what did you see? >> well, the fascinating thing about technology businesses in the internet is that a company can become a global brand and get global reach in a stunningly quick period of time. that's what e-bay did in its first five to ten years. he became a glal phenom in a stunningly short period
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: benh zeitlin is here. when he made his direct orial debut "beast of the southern wild" last year it became a movie everybody is talking b the story of hush puppie a 9-year-old girl faced with the illness of her father. it became the runnaway hit of lastr's film festival skirt winning awards at sundance and at cannes and now nominated for four academy awards including best director and best picture. here is the trailer of beasts of the southern wild. >> the whole universe depends on everything fitting together just right. if one piece busts, even the smallest pie, the entire universe -- >> this here is an auroch, a fierce creature. >> the storm's coming. >> the you all better learn how to survive. >> it is pie job to take care of you, okay? >> all was iet goes hine my eyes, i see everything that made made me. >> flying around in invisible pieces. i see that i'm a little piece of a big, big universe. >> you going to be the king, i promise that. >> in a million years, when kid goes to s
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> steven brill is here, he wrote the cover story of this week's "time" magazine. it is called bitter pill, why medical bills are killing us. it is the longest piece by a single author ever published by time. it took brill seven months to research and write. he analyzes bills from hospitals, doctors an drug companies to paint an extraordinary picture of medical overspendingment i'm pleased to have stef steven brill back at this table, welcome. >> thanks, charlie. >> rose: what got you here this longest piece. >> as you know i like t pick topics where i just feel that i'm curious about them. and for a long time i have just been curious about why health-care costs so much. you know, we've had years of debate about who should pay for health care. how should we do insurance, and who should pay the bills. but i've never seen anyone stop to say hey, wait a minute, how come if will cost you 20 or 25,000 dollars if god-- as you're walking ot of this building, you slip-and-fall and land on your elbow. whwill it cost a million
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: in less than four days $85 billion in aubling spending cuts will begin to ripple through the u.s. onomy. the impact will be felt across society from education, to medical care to national defense. the sequester deadline imposed in the summer of 2011 was intended to sharpern the government's focus on the fat debt. president obama pushed for a last minute compromise to lessen the economic damage. >> these impacts will not all be felt on day one. but rest assured the uncertainty is already having an effect. companies are preparing layoff notices. families are preparing to cut back on expenses. and the longer these cuts are in place, the bigger the impact will become. >> these cut does not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> rose: steve rattner has had a distinguished career in journalism, business and government, instrumental in turning around the automobile industry, and currently chairman of advisors and the economic analyst for msnbc's morning jo
funding provided by these funders:. >> from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: jay fishman is here, he is is the chairman & ceo of travelers. it is one of the nation's leading providers in property & casualty insurance. travelers has also been a leader in corporate america to help educate the public at america's debt crisis. the company recently partnered with public television on a documentary underscoring the urgent challenge ahead it is called overdraft and here is the trailer. >> some people understandably say this is sort of dry subject, dollars, cents, debt. what's it mean to me. if i read the mathematics right it means everything. >> i really genuinely believe this threatens the fundamental economic security of the united states. >> a lot of the democrats are mad because they say well, this is mostly caused by the republicans. without cut taxes and increased spending. the problem for the democrats is that if you look at the next ten years, most of it will be caused by things we care about. >> all of us are invested in this democracy. we are to the going
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: lawrence summers is here, he is a professor at harvard, where he was president from 2001 to 2006. he was treasury secretary under president clinton and returned to the white house in 2009 as advisor of the national economic council, in that role he was central to president obama's the response to the financial crisis, he is here to talk about the scwes officer imposed in summer of 2011 and intended as a consequence so unaccepble congssnd theresident would have to agree on revenue increases and spending cuts in order to avoid it. with three days to go they have not been able to do that, the first $85 billion about spending cuts will take effect on march 1st, ben bernanke testified to cock earlier today he promised to extend the federal reserve stimulus measures and make made a direct appeal to avoid the sequester. >> the congress and the administration should consider replacing the sharp front loaded spending cuts required by the sequestration with policies that reduce the federal deficit more gradlly in the near
was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: tom donilon is here, he is the president's national security advisor. part of his job is to prepare and deliver the presidential daily brief on national security. joe biden has called him the most important person in the mix this week in the vice president spoke about foreign policy challenges at the munish security conference. >> we have made it clear at the outset that we would not-- we would be prepared to me bilaterally with the irani leadership. we would not make it a secret that we were doing that. we would let our partners know if that occasion presented itself. that offer stands. nearly all of our partners and allies are convinced that president assad is a tyrant, hell-bent on clinging to power, is no longer fit to lead the syrian people and he must go. >> as well as syria and iran the united states faces new challenges from islammix extremism in african, yet it is not clear they are ready to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are sch
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. 85th academy awards will be announced sunday night february 24th. from mythic story telling to epic survival, the films take us on a voyage exploring where we were an where we are headed. this year's movies are about our political and cultural landscape. they show us a world in which we look terror in the face, a world of equality, a world of aspiration for a new and better society. tonight we bring 13 nominees who have talked about their craft over the last year. we begin with three of the contenders for best actor. >> yeah, come on, dad, be nice. she's making crabby snacks and homemades. come on, dad! >> bradley cooper plays pat, an impassioned but fragile teacher getting his life back on track. >> about a week before the incident i called the cops and told them that my wife and the history guy were ploying against me by embezzling money from the local hospital which-- wasn't true, it was a delusion. and we later fund out from the hospital it's because i'm-- i'm diagnosed bipolar. >> yeah. >> why is this a character you
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)